Trailer: “Chasing Madoff”

It seems the time for docs about Wall Street villains is over. “Inside Job” won the Oscar, its weak British cousin, “The Flaw,” already left on the wayside. And Alex Gibney doesn’t appear to have any films involving finance out anytime soon (of course he could rise out of nowhere with one). But here’s “Chasing Madoff,” which looks kind of like a Gibney doc while sounding like a movie in which Ben Affleck tries to woo ex-NASDAQ Chairman Bernie Madoff despite the fact he’s not into dudes.

That title is changed from the book it’s based upon, Harry Markopolis’ “No One Would Listen: A True Financial Thriller,”¬†but it fits (unlike former title “The Foxhounds”). The doc is about Markopopis chasing Madoff, in the form of his whistleblowing investigation that too long was disregarded and blocked. On screen, Markopolis’ testimonial appears to be the foundation for the film to work, and based on the trailer he seems like he could carry it well.

Hopefully I don’t get scammed and the doc, directed by Jeff Prosserman, is actually as good as it looks. We’ll see when the film opens in major cities August 26.

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Trailers: “Tarantino: Disciple of Hong Kong”; “Alice Walker: Beauty in Truth” and “The Flaw”

There are a few documentary trailers out this week for films that I haven’t yet seen but which seem pretty interesting. To both myself and other doc fans and non-doc fans alike. The range of topics include film history, biography and the financial crisis.

One that is obviously making the more mainstream blogosphere rounds this week is the French-produced film “Tarantino: Disciple¬†of Hong Kong,” which of course covers Quentin Tarantino‘s HK cinema influences. And, um, I saw a “Cannonball Run II” poster slipped in there somewhere. Anyway, it features interviews with many filmmakers, such as Ringo Lam, and scholars, such as David Bordwell. Watch that one after the jump.

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Doc Talk: Oscar Winners vs. Classic Documentaries

Doc Talk is a bi-weekly column at Cinematical.com dedicated to non-fiction cinema.

Which film is more likely to become a documentary classic, ‘Inside Job’ or ‘Exit Through the Gift Shop’? Regardless of our preference, we can all agree Banksy’s Oscar-losing fan favorite is a more timeless story and will likely be more enjoyable with repeat viewings. Charles Ferguson’s Academy Award-winning look at the financial crisis will certainly remain a great piece of historical document but probably won’t be revisited often for entertainment or artistic value. And sadly, like many timely docs, it could even one day be forgotten, like Lee Grant’s 1986 Oscar-winning Reagonomics critique ‘Down and Out in America,’ which is pretty obscure only 25 years later.

Before announcing the Best Picture winner Sunday night, Steven Spielberg made a comment clearly meant to appease Team ‘The Social Network’ by implying that losing the award still puts a film in good company (his examples being ‘Grapes of Wrath,’ ‘Citizen Kane,’ ‘The Graduate’ and ‘Raging Bull’). The same goes for the Best Documentary Feature award. ‘Inside Job’ joins the likes of ‘Woodstock,’ ‘Hearts and Minds,’ ‘Bowling for Columbine’ and ‘Man on Wire.’ ‘Exit,’ meanwhile, joins a group including ‘In the Year of the Pig,’ ‘Streetwise,’ ‘Capturing the Friedmans’ and ‘Encounters at the End of the World.’

Continue reading this column at Cinematical.